Non-Compliance with COVID-19 Screening in Pakistan

A Cross-Sectional Survey

Keywords: non-compliance, gender, education level, COVID-19 screening

Abstract

Objectives: To quantify the non-complaint portion of the general public – not wanting to be screened for COVID-19 and find the reason for this non-compliance, in the general public of Rawalpindi Pakistan.

Study Design: Cross-sectional survey.

Place and Duration of Study: General public of Rawalpindi, Pakistan. From June 19, 2020, to June 21, 2020.

Methodology: A questionnaire was constructed based on a local study, it was injected to the accessible online population through Google Forms. Surveyors collected data from the illiterate population on printed proforma. A sample of 1108 was collected. IBM® SPSS® was used for data analysis. For categorical data, frequencies and percentages were calculated. A Chi-square test was applied for statistical significance.

Results: 45.3% of participants were females, 54.7% were males. 37.9% of participants were married and 62.1% were unmarried. 3.8% were illiterate, 40.4% were matriculated and 47.1% had education higher than intermediate. 38.3% was non-compliant population – didn’t want to get screened for COVID-19. 30.7% were non-compliant because of ‘fear of isolation/ quarantine with other COVID-19 patients, leading to worsening of disease’ followed by 26.9% who ‘don’t trust the reliability of the test’. Gender and Education level variables were statistically significant in determining non-compliance. Marital status was found non-significant.

Conclusion: A significant portion of the population i.e. 38.3% showed non-compliance with COVID-19 screening, which was statistically associated with gender and education level.

Author Biographies

Muhammad Raheel Raza

MBBS

Postgraduate trainee, Internal Medicine.

Medical Unit - I.

Holy Family Hospital, Rawalpindi.

Saima Naz

MBBS

House Officer

Rawalpindi Medical University and Allied Hospitals.

Muhammad Umar

FCPS, FRCP, FACG, FAGA

Vice Chancellor

Rawalpindi Medical University and Allied Hospitals.

Aqsa Hameed

Women Medical Officer

Basic Helth Unit

PHFMC, Faisalabad.

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Published
2020-08-09
How to Cite
1.
Taj F, Raza M, Naz S, Umar M, Hameed A. Non-Compliance with COVID-19 Screening in Pakistan. JRMC [Internet]. 9Aug.2020 [cited 27Sep.2020];24(Supp-1):50-5. Available from: http://journalrmc.com/index.php/JRMC/article/view/1429