To determine the frequency of Group B Streptococcal colonization of vagina in women at 35-37 week pregnancy

  • Sadia Azmat
  • Faiza Iqbal cpsp
  • Shabnam Tahir
  • Mariam Khalid
  • Sadia Mustafa
  • Wajeeha Asghar Alvi
Keywords: Pregnancy, last trimester, Group B Streptococcal colonization of vagina

Abstract

Introduction: Group B streptococci (GBS) is usually present in a vaginal canal in micro-flora, which usually do not exhibit any symptoms. Instead, in pregnancy, there are certain situations in GBS colonization in the vagina, which may lead to several complications.
Objective: To determine the frequency of Group B Streptococcal colonization of the vagina in women at 35-37 weeks of pregnancy.
Study Design: Cross-sectional survey
Setting: Antenatal clinic, Shalamar Hospital Lahore
Study duration: 6 month i.e. From: 05-09-2014 to 06-03-2015
Materials and Methods: 350 Booked Patients attending antenatal clinic at Shalamar hospital at 35-37 weeks of pregnancy for routine antenatal checkups were included. Lower vaginal swabs were taken without speculum using sterilized disposable cotton swab and transported to Amies Agar jell and transported to microbiology lab within 24 hours. Laboratory report was collected and reviewed by researcher regarding positive or negative culture for GBS. Patients with positive GBS culture were given intrapartum antibiotics.
Results: In our study, out of 350 cases, with the mean age of 26.92+4.84 years. Frequency of GBS colonization of vagina in women at 35-37 week pregnancy was recorded in 12.29% while remaining 87.71% had no findings of the morbidity.
Conclusion: It was concluded that the frequency of GBS colonization of vagina in women at 35-37 week of pregnancy is not very higher.

References

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Published
2022-06-30
How to Cite
1.
Azmat S, Iqbal F, Tahir S, Khalid M, Mustafa S, Alvi W. To determine the frequency of Group B Streptococcal colonization of vagina in women at 35-37 week pregnancy. JRMC [Internet]. 30Jun.2022 [cited 12Aug.2022];26(2):249-52. Available from: https://journalrmc.com/index.php/JRMC/article/view/1819
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Articles